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We stand with Futures Against Violence statement on the Chauvin trial:

Chauvin Conviction Just and Consequential.
Ending Racism and Systemic Inequity Must Continue.

Yesterday's guilty verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd can be more than just one important moment in our history. We hope it stands as the momentous bellwether our country so desperately needs.

Nearly one year after the world watched then-police-officer Chauvin execute Mr. Floyd by putting a knee to his neck for an excruciating 9 minutes and 29 seconds, a jury found him guilty on all counts. We hope and expect Judge Cahill will impose a just sentence.

Mr. Floyd’s daughter was right when she said “my daddy changed the world;” his tragic murder invigorated a movement to end racism in policing in communities across this country and all around the globe. This verdict must continue, not conclude, this crucial movement. Today’s outcome against one officer will not undo decades of damage and death caused by white supremacy. It won’t wholly heal our nation nor redeem our humanity, but it can serve as another crucial signal to transform racist systems and help realize Futures Without Violence. In collaboration with our partners, with advocates and allies, and with all who must never again stand by silently, we pledge to continue the struggle. Justice demands that we work tirelessly to reimagine law and policy to end white supremacy and the outrageous depravity we see too often in law enforcement today.
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We stand with Futures Against Violence statement on the Chauvin trial:  Chauvin Conviction Just and Consequential.
Ending Racism and Systemic Inequity Must Continue.  Yesterdays guilty verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd can be more than just one important moment in our history. We hope it stands as the momentous bellwether our country so desperately needs.  Nearly one year after the world watched then-police-officer Chauvin execute Mr. Floyd by putting a knee to his neck for an excruciating 9 minutes and 29 seconds, a jury found him guilty on all counts. We hope and expect Judge Cahill will impose a just sentence.  Mr. Floyd’s daughter was right when she said “my daddy changed the world;” his tragic murder invigorated a movement to end racism in policing in communities across this country and all around the globe. This verdict must continue, not conclude, this crucial movement. Today’s outcome against one officer will not undo decades of damage and death caused by white supremacy. It won’t wholly heal our nation nor redeem our humanity, but it can serve as another crucial signal to transform racist systems and help realize Futures Without Violence. In collaboration with our partners, with advocates and allies, and with all who must never again stand by silently, we pledge to continue the struggle. Justice demands that we work tirelessly to reimagine law and policy to end white supremacy and the outrageous depravity we see too often in law enforcement today.

Trauma from Sexual Assault

When a person is the victim/survivor of sexual assault there are many things that can happen in the brain. Most people have the misconception of how sexual assault survivors should act. Many of these are inaccurate. Some of the misconceptions are that the person will fight back during the attack. Whether that be yelling at the perpetrator, pushing them off, or trying to get away. After the attack people believe the victim with instantly go to the police or hospital to report the rape and know exactly what to do (i.e. not shower or brush your teeth). This is not always the case. Many victims/survivors do not try to fight back. They will go through what is called the freeze faze. They are unable to move or speak. This is the bodies way of protecting itself. Many victims also wait to report the incident. Not because it did not happen but because they are trying to process exactly what happened for themselves. These are just a few examples of how trauma can affect a person who has experienced sexual trauma. The best thing that we can do as a community is stop and listen to them. Believe what they are telling us and NEVER pass judgement.
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Trauma from Sexual Assault  When a person is the victim/survivor of sexual assault there are many things that can happen in the brain. Most people have the misconception of how sexual assault survivors should act. Many of these are inaccurate. Some of the misconceptions are that the person will fight back during the attack. Whether that be yelling at the perpetrator, pushing them off, or trying to get away. After the attack people believe the victim with instantly go to the police or hospital to report the rape and know exactly what to do (i.e. not shower or brush your teeth). This is not always the case. Many victims/survivors do not try to fight back. They will go through what is called the freeze faze. They are unable to move or speak. This is the bodies way of protecting itself. Many victims also wait to report the incident. Not because it did not happen but because they are trying to process exactly what happened for themselves. These are just a few examples of how trauma can affect a person who has experienced sexual trauma. The best thing that we can do as a community is stop and listen to them. Believe what they are telling us and NEVER pass judgement.

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I can testify to the fact that rape induced paralysis does in fact happen. Beat myself up for 20 years cause I wondered why my body failed me and why I couldn't fight back.

We are continuing to introduce staff members here at the Women's Center and Harbor house and detailing some of the services they provide.

Today, we want to take a moment to introduce Rachel, our Sexual Assault Therapist. Rachel is a new addition to our team here at the WC and offers one on one Sexual Assault Therapy as well as SA Group Therapy. She is an excellent resource for anyone who is struggling with carrying the trauma of Sexual Assault. Her direct line is 906.225.1346 x 209
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We are continuing to  introduce staff members here at the Womens Center and Harbor house and detailing some of the services they provide.  Today, we want to take a moment to introduce Rachel, our Sexual Assault Therapist. Rachel is a new addition to our team here at the WC and offers one on one Sexual Assault Therapy as well as SA Group Therapy. She is an excellent resource for anyone who is struggling with carrying the trauma of Sexual Assault. Her direct line is 906.225.1346 x 209
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